Whale Done Summary


#1

Originally published at: https://blog.12min.com/whale-done-summary/

Whale Done Summary

The Power of Positive Relationships

What could a person possibly learn form the techniques used to train killer whales? As you will see in “Whale Done” - many things!

About Ken Blanchard, Thad Lacinak, Chuck Tompkins and Jim Ballard

Kenneth H. Blanchard

Ken Blanchard is a bestselling author and Chairman of the Board of theBlanchard Companies.

Thad Lacinak is vice president of Animal Training for Busch Entertainment Corporation

Chuck Tompkins is a curator and vice president of Animal Training at SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida.

Jim Ballard is a writer, an educator, and a corporate trainer.

"Whale Done Summary"

There are many things one can learn from observing the nature, animals and their behaviors.

“Whale Done” is a story about Wes Kingsley who, when going to Florida, for a business conference, visits SeaWorld for the killer whale show.

In that time of his life, he is having a hard time getting employees at work to improve their performance, and while watching the show, he wonders how he can use the techniques that killer whales trainers use to make them perform better.

So, what does Wes Kingsley find out?

First, whales will not comply unless they trust you. So, the trainers feed them and play with them. By doing them, they are building a relationship which leads to trust.

Second, the trainers create an environment in which the whales can both have fun and learn and develop. To simplify the process, whale trainers start with easy lessons. This technique works with humans as well.

Third, the trainers have clear expectations of the whales and encourage the right behavior by clearly showing the consequences of different actions.

Whenever your employees do something wrong, respond positively, by providing redirection, or refocusing their energy toward what you want them to do.

Taking this path is far easier and way more efficient.

Finally, do not forget to show your trust and faith in the person, despite their behavioral troubles.

For some, this process may seem manipulative, but it is merely a process that lets you find people’s motivation, and ignite it, so they become higher achievers.

Be careful not to make people dependent on your praise, but to create an environment in which people do what is right, even when nobody is watching.

Key Lessons from “Whale Done”

1. Build Trust by Accentuating the Positive 2. Steps in the Redirection Response 3. Elements of the Whale Done Response

Build Trust by Accentuating the Positive

Ignore the negative behavior, and shower the positive behaviors with attention. Why? Because people crave attention, and when they realize that they will get it only if they do well – they will try more subconsciously.

Steps in the Redirection Response

  • Describe the issue immediately, without blaming anyone.
  • Show why the mistake has an adverse effect.
  • If the task was not clear, take the blame for not making it understandable.
  • Review in detail what the person is supposed to do.

Elements of the Whale Done Response

  • Give people praise right away.
  • Be concrete in telling them what they “did right or almost right.”
  • Show them that you value what they did.
  • Encourage them to keep going.
Like this summary? We'd Like to invite you to download our free 12 min app, for more amazing summaries and audiobooks.

“Whale Done” Quotes

[bctt tweet="These animals are not so different from people. They’ll show you when they don’t like how you’re treating them." username="get12min"]

[bctt tweet=“The more attention you pay to a behavior, the more it will be repeated.” username=“get12min”]

[bctt tweet=“Build trust. Accentuate the positive. When mistakes occur, redirect the energy.” username=“get12min”]

[bctt tweet=“Redirection is the best way to turn countless low morale situations around.” username=“get12min”]

[bctt tweet=“Praise progress. It’s a moving target.” username=“get12min”]

Get more nuggets!